“Revolutionary Road”

Here’s a book review of interest to all of us who grew up during the 1950s. The book is “Revolutionary Road,” by Richard Yates, and the review is over at Baroque In Hackney.

Here’s a quote from the review that rings true with me:

“Of course, it’s a tragedy. But it’s a nasty tragedy. It’s not a tragedy about the price of conformity, it’s more about the danger of imagining yourself better than everyone else. It’s the fifties turned inside out, and I found myself laughing out loud in inappropriate places, just for the joy of it.”

So many of us imagine ourselves as “better than everyone else.” The Tea Party leaps to my mind.  

But I have to admit that progressive Democrats like me are no less guilty of the “better than everyone else” syndrome. Also guilty are so many college graduates, and Christians, and American citizens. (I fall into each of those categories, as well.)

In America today, we are particularly quick to pass judgment on the poor and the unemployed.

“Judge not, lest ye not be judged.”

“Better than everyone else.” It’s an illusion, a trap, and of course a judgment that none of us is worthy to make about others.

— John Hayden

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2 Comments

Filed under Books, Democracy, History

2 responses to ““Revolutionary Road”

  1. Thanks for the link! Glad you enjoyed the post – it’s a great book. No one escapes unscathed, not even the reader. And best of luck with your austerity project, I have to try and follow your example. First step: stop buying books!

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    • Buying books is my downfall! The books at the library are free, but they frown on using a highlighter on them. If I could break my addiction to highlighting, I could save a lot of money on books. Under my Austerity Project, i have to think hard before buying a book.

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